CPR for Adults, Children and Infants

Guest post: Hello, my name is Carla and I own a business called First Aid Confidence. This is my third blog for Mumsnet Local. This month I will be discussing CPR for adults, children and infants which, is a sensitive subject, however it is an extremely important skill to possess.

What is CPR?
CPR is the abbreviation for Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation. CPR is the process of delivery chest compressions and breaths to someone who is not breathing. If someone is not breathing, you can assume that they are in cardiac arrest, which means that their heart is not pumping blood around their body and therefore not delivering oxygen to the cells within their body. CPR is a technique that is used to manually pump blood around a person’s body by performing chest compressions and increasing the amount of oxygen within their body by performing breaths. CPR is vitally important as it can increase someone’s chances of survival once the ambulance service arrives.

When should you use CPR?
CPR should be used on anyone who is unconscious and not breathing.

CPR for an Adult.
To perform CPR on an adult after confirming that they are not breathing:

  • Put gloves on
  • Kneel by the side of the person
  • Interlock your hands
  • Place your hands in the centre of the persons chest (on the breastbone)
  • Lock your arms
  • Lean forward ensuring that your shoulders are directly over your wrists
  • Push down on the chest to a depth of 5-6cm and then raise your hands to allow the chest to return to its normal shape but do not remove your hands from the chest. Continue these compressions 30 times at a rate of 100-120 per minute.
  • After 30 compressions, tip the persons head back to open their airway by placing your fingers on their chin and their forehead. Pinch their nose, seal your lips around their mouth and deliver 2 breaths, each lasting for one second and observe whether the chest is rising. It is advised that a face shield is used when performing breaths on someone to reduce the risk of infection
  • Then perform 30 more chest compressions and continue at a ratio of 30 compressions to 2 breaths
  • Handover to somebody else if possible as CPR requires a lot of effort and it is recommended that people alternate every two minutes
  • The face mask should only be used by one person
    FACBLOG3AThe advert produced by the British Heart Foundation takes a slightly comical stance however it highlights the main points very well. The video uses compression only CPR, which can be used if you would prefer not to perform the breaths.

CPR for a Child

A child is defined as one year old up to puberty.

CPR for a child uses the Call Fast approach where one minute of CPR is performed before calling for an ambulance.

To perform CPR on a child, the same technique can be used as for an adult however you only use one hand for the compressions. CPR for a child should be started by providing 5 breaths and then 30 compressions, which should be at a depth of one third of the chest. The ratio then continues at 30 compressions to 2 breaths for a minute before calling for an ambulance. Then CPR should be commenced again.

FACBLOG3bCPR for an Infant
An infant is defined as new born up to one year old.

To perform CPR on an infant, you do not need to tilt the infants head back to provide breaths, just ensure that their head is facing upwards and seal your mouth around their nose and mouth. The Call Fast approach should be used and CPR should start with 5 breaths and then continue at a ratio of 30 compressions (at a depth of one third of the chest) to 2 breaths for a minute. Chest compressions should be performed with two fingers of one hand. Then call for an ambulance and commence CPR again.
FACBLOG3c

In Summary
CPR for an Adult:

 

  1. Establish that the person is not breathing
  2. Call 999
  3. Commence CPR: 30 compressions (with two hands) then 2 breaths continuously

(until you are too tired to carry on, someone takes over from you or the ambulance arrives and takes over)

CPR for a Child

  1. Establish that the child is not breathing
  2. Deliver 5 breaths
  3. Commence CPR: 30 compressions (with one hand) then 2 breaths for one minute
  4. Call 999
  5. Continue CPR

(until you are too tired to carry on, someone takes over from you or the ambulance arrives and takes over)

CPR for an Infant:

  1. Establish that the infant is not breathing
  2. Deliver 5 breaths
  3. Commence CPR: 30 compressions (with two fingers) then 2 breaths for one minute
  4. Call 999
  5. Continue CPR

(until you are too tired to carry on, someone takes over from you or the ambulance arrives and takes over)

I hope you’ve found my blog helpful. This is a brief overview of CPR. If you would like to learn more about First Aid and get some practical experience then please contact me as I would be more than happy to provide this for you. The more people who have First Aid skills the better!

Next month I will be discussing Choking Management for Adults, Children and Infants.

A little bit about me and First Aid Confidence.
The purpose of First Aid Confidence is to deliver affordable, effective First Aid Training in a professional yet relaxed manner that enables every learner to obtain the knowledge and skills that they require to perform First Aid competently and confidently. I want everybody who attends one of my courses to have the knowledge and confidence to carry out first aid should the need arise and I am committed to ensuring that every person has the opportunity to learn first aid. My previous role was within the ambulance service and I am a fully qualified first aid instructor. I offer first aid at work courses as well as paediatric first aid courses that meet Ofsted requirements and I am also keen to provide bespoke courses for parents who want to learn the skills needed to manage situations such as a child choking or an unconscious child.

Visit my website at www.firstaidconfidence.co.uk to find out more about the courses and other benefits that First Aid Confidence provides. You can also email me at carla@firstaidconfidence.co.uk or call me on 07939 885330 for an informal chat about First Aid Training.

 

NHS Choices, 2014. First Aid – CPR. [online] Available at:

<http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Accidents-and-first-aid/Pages/CPR.aspx> [Accessed 20 July 2014].

 

 

 

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